The development of the peripheral nervous system in the fruitfly Drosophila

Published on September 29, 2008 Reviewed on May 31, 2018   40 min

Other Talks in the Category: Neuroscience

0:00
Hello. My name is Hugo Bellen. I'm a member of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Then I'm currently at Baylor College of Medicine. I'll be talking about "The Development of the Peripheral Nervous System in the Fruit Fly Drosophila". And the reason why we studied the development of the peripheral nervous system in the fruit flies is that it has been an excellent model system to identify new components that are required for the formation of neurons and further development of the nervous system. Before I describe the development of the nervous system, I will introduce you to the different senses and how the fruit fly copes with the different senses.
0:44
There are five peripheral senses, sight, smell, taste, hearing, and proprioception. Sight is provided by the eyes and is not the topic of this lecture today. Smell is provided by olfactory receptors in the antenna or the nose in vertebrates and in humans. Taste is provided by taste receptors in the labia of the fruit fly and the legs, typically the tongue in humans. Hearing is provided by the johnston organ in the antenna or the ear in humans. And proprioception is provided by external sensory organs that essentially cover the entire body. So this is also called sometimes the sixth sense, it's the sense by which we sense where all our different body parts are, that is, or muscles or limbs or fingers or toes, etc. Every organism that moves needs proprioception and needs information about where its different body parts are and this is provided by external sensory organs. Here I'll briefly introduce you to hearing in the johnston organs and proprioceptive devices in the skin of the fruit fly or in the cuticle of the fruit fly.
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The development of the peripheral nervous system in the fruitfly Drosophila

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