Distributed teams as distributed economic development

Published on January 31, 2023   29 min

Other Talks in the Series: Future Work Now

0:00
Hi, my name is John O'Duinn. I'm a senior strategist at Civic Actions and I live in San Francisco, California. For the last 28 years I've been working in physically distributed teams. For the last 14 years of that I've been actually running and leading those distributed teams. For seven years now I've been coaching and mentoring founders and C-level executives of various locations and sizes of organizations. In 2018, I published my business management book Distributed Teams, the art and practice of working together while physically apart. Since 2016, I've been helping jurisdictions with transition to a different type of economic development, which I call distributed economic development.
0:48
Before COVID 19, it's worth noting that the rules were already changing in society. Let's just talk about a few things here.
0:57
There used to be people having a job for life, that does not exist anymore. Generally, people expect to only work in a company for a couple of years now. Baby Boomers in the United States work 4.2 years at a company. That's an average across all industries across the entire country. In Silicon Valley, the turnover is even faster, people are staying 1.2-2.0 years. That means that when they are joining a company on their first day, they're already thinking about where this job will help line them up for the next job. This is a very high turnover, very short retention scenario. This has been going on in society for decades. This turns into a business changes where you have more project employees, you hire people for a particular thing and then people let go. Turns into Aqua hiring companies, it means that companies are always hiring. It means that humans are always thinking about the next job after the current job.
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Distributed teams as distributed economic development

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