Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neurotoxicity

Published on February 27, 2020   39 min

Other Talks in the Category: Diseases, Disorders & Treatments

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My name is we Guido Cavaletti. I'm a neurologists working at University of Milano-Bicocca in Monza, Italy. I am the Head of the Experimental Neurology Unit, where we combine clinical and preclinical assessment of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neurotoxicity, in order to better understand which are the reasons why a patient can develop this kind of very severe side effect, and which might be the possible prevention strategy to limit the severity of the disease.
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Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neurotoxicity is a very complex topic. One of the main reasons why it is complex is that, several players are involved around the same problem. The patient who is faced with cancer and needs to be treated with drugs that can be neurotoxic. The oncologist who is in charge of the treatment of the patient and of the selection of the best treatment schedule, and is well aware that he can be the reason for the development of side effects, and the neurologists who are in charge of monitoring and assessing the severity of the neurotoxic side effect. The interaction between all these people can be difficult from different contexts and for different reasons. Patients are required to be treated with the best treatment available, and then to under-report the occurrence of mild side effects. Oncologists need to follow effective protocols, and are well aware that the only way to limit the severity of CIPN is to reduce the drug or even withdraw from the treatment. Neurologists are often faced with the problem once neuropathy is already clearly evident, and in most cases is too late to really intervene with some effective procedure or treatment. So for all these reasons, this is a clear example of a multi-disciplinary clinical need that still needs to be addressed in much more deep detail.
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Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neurotoxicity

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