Genomic studies of Alzheimer’s disease: history, progress, and future directions

Published on January 31, 2018   42 min

Other Talks in the Therapeutic Area: Neurology

0:00
Hi! My name is Adam Naj. I'm a genetic epidemiologist at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, and I'd like to present today on the genomic studies of Alzheimer's disease, both taking you through a history of work that has already been done to identify genetic risk factors from Alzheimer's disease, bring you up to date on current progress, and give you some insights on the future directions that genomic studies of Alzheimer's disease will be taking.
0:23
To give you a brief overview of my presentation today, I'd like to go into some background on Alzheimer's disease, including a discussion of the pathology of the disease and some description of the epidemiology of the disease and underlying environmental risk factors of the disease. For the main focus of the talk on the genetics of Alzheimer's, I'd like to give you a description and some background on the genetics underlying the rare early onset form of Alzheimer's disease. The main focus of the genetics of Alzheimer's will be on the genes underlying late onset Alzheimer's disease, and those include brief departure and focus on the APOE gene, the strongest known genetic risk factor for late onset Alzheimer's, as well as an overview of genome-wide association studies that have been used to identify some of the common genomic variants contributing to the late onset Alzheimer's risk. In addition, I'll be following up with information on new and ongoing studies of a rare genomic variant contributing to Alzheimer's disease and this includes a survey of some exome array studies that have been done, as well as a survey of whole genome sequencing and whole exome sequencing studies that are currently ongoing; And I'd like to also go into a discussion of some of the work that has been done to identify genes with multiple variants contributing to disease including pathways that have multiple genes known to contribute to Alzheimer's risk and what those pathways might provide us in terms of insights into disease pathology. We'll also briefly at the end, take an opportunity to go over some future directions of genomic studies of Alzheimer's disease.
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Genomic studies of Alzheimer’s disease: history, progress, and future directions

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