Person-centred approaches to care

Published on January 30, 2017   41 min
0:00
Hello, my name is Brendan McCormack and I'm Professor of Nursing and Head of the Division of Nursing at Queen Margaret University in Edinburgh. I'm also an Honorary Nurse Consultant in Gerontology at NHS Fife. I hold a number of other positions internationally. And the title of my talk today is "Person-Centred Approaches to Care" which is also the focus of my program of research. I do have a particular interest in gerontology but my talk today is applied generally.
0:30
I wanted to put this slide up which is a photograph of the cover of our current book, from which a lot of the text, that I'm delivering in this lecture, is derived. And this builds on our previous publication which had a specific focus on nursing, whereas, this one has more of a broad focus on healthcare more generally.
0:53
I wanted to start off by talking a little bit about, person-centredness more generally. It's very true to say that today, in the nursing world, there is a strong desire to live out person-centred values. And it would be unusual to meet with nurse leaders or practicing nurses who don't in some way espouse person-centred values. They have become very much a core part of what nursing is actually about. However, my colleague Tanya McCance and I have published, "We recognize that espousing these values in everyday practice is one thing but making them real in the constant stressful environment that many nurses are working in. An environment where there is a constant tussle between conflicting priorities. But also environments that are often chaotic and sometimes very unpredictable... that whilst we espouse these values, that the reality is for many practitioners, they really struggle to live them out in any meaningful way."
1:54
In our most recent research, we identified that one of the reasons for this, is that patients, as they are going through a system, have a whole variety of experiences. And this study was based on narrative work that we engaged in with patients from a whole variety of settings, going through a hospital setting. And we analyzed those narratives to see what were the common threads and themes that people talked about, when they talked about their experience of nursing in the health care. And the theme that came across more strongly was that of vulnerability. And once we do know, and there is a lot of literature to demonstrate that patients generally feel vulnerable, when they're in a healthcare setting. And I think we all can recognize and empathize with that. What they talked about particularly was the vulnerability they experienced, at what we described, as the junctures of systems. That is when they're connecting with points of contact at different parts of the system. And those systems are often very unknown to them. And therefore, the nurse has this very important role in ensuring consistency of the care processes, and that the response in those processes is also consistent. And what the people, who took part in our study, commented on most was that, they felt very vulnerable when nurses seemed to be inconsistent, or seemed to not be focused on helping them, across these different systems that they were working in. And that often, they didn't know what the response was going to be and that increased the level of vulnerability. And we believe that's a really important finding in the context of how people are treated as persons in a healthcare system. And how nurses have a really critical role to ensure that their personhood is maintained, as they experience their care in different parts of the system.
Hide

Person-centred approaches to care

Embed in course/own notes