Identifying the trauma footprint of acquired brain injury

Published on July 31, 2016   34 min

Other Talks in the Series: Neurotrauma

0:00
Identifying the Trauma Footprint of Acquired Brain Injury, Dr. Christine Durham.
0:08
"If I have lost confidence in myself, I have the universe against me". This talk gives an explanation about how the consequences of brain injury can have a devastating effect on the person with brain injury. So they feel unsure, uncertain, unloved, unlovable, and not understood. Additionally, they may have great difficulty understanding explanations about brain injury. Note that traumatic brain injury, TBI, is a form of acquired brain injury, ABI. For this presentation, I'll use the term ABI, which includes TBI.
0:49
Trauma footprint of acquired brain injury, or traumatic brain injury, can seem overwhelming. I felt as if I was walking in a maze. I was none willingly lost in a giant puzzle. I didn't know where I was going, or how to escape the maze that the world had suddenly become. I'd lost touch with the outside world. Somewhere in my head, I knew things used to make sense. But now, the world seemed strange. I'd lost myself. I no longer knew who I was, my name, my likes, and things I didn't like. Everything was a puzzle, as I couldn't understand words, concepts, or what to do. Now in retrospect, I see that ABI can be viewed as a labyrinth.
1:32
A labyrinth is a single path for personal and psychological transformation. The lives of more than 2 in every 100 people are affected by ABI. These people find themselves in the labyrinth of ABI. The world and other people can seem dark, frightening, and menacing. Greater understanding about the trauma footprint of ABI can light their path. A new understanding is needed to tackle their new life. Professionals can help them understand by addressing more than the physical difficulties, by showing insight into the trauma that they are experiencing.
2:17
After speaking with hundreds of people with ABI, considering the wives of Henry VIII allows us to identify how many people might feel. They feel doomed.
2:30
Catherine of Aragon was cast off. She was banished. And she died of a broken heart. Many people with ABI feel banished from life. There is a stigma attached to ABI. They're ashamed to be different, to look different, and to seem slow and dumb. Tremendous loss comes with ABI. They try to struggle through life with a broken heart.
2:55
Anne Boleyn was famous for her temper and her sharp tongue. She went from being dressed in gold. Then came her trial. She was blindfolded and executed. Many people with ABI go from a life that is rich to a life blindfolded. They can't see or understand. They may feel as if they've lost their head, or as if their brains had been rearranged, or somehow removed. They may find they've lost control of their temper and tongue due to frustration. They may also feel that they've lost their old life as they've known it before.
3:34
Jane Seymour died from medical reasons. Today, many more people survive because of medical interventions. I've found it interesting to observe the difference in perception of those whose lives were saved by medical intervention, for example, stroke or brain tumor, compared with people who needed no medical intervention. But, there's no medical cure for brain injury.
4:00
Anne of Cleeves. Her marriage was annulled. She was smart enough to know that there would be trouble if she made objections. She was bullied. Many people with ABI feel pushed around, like the man who said he was smacked by his wife. The young lady who was told she was lazy by her parents. Many people with brain injury believe they are treated as if they're guilty. They're just pretending to have their difficulties. They're a bit like dirty, rotten scoundrels! I should mention this may be due to many factors, including faulty thinking, overgeneralizing, blaming, catastrophizing, minimizing, mind reading, and post-traumatic stress.
4:43
Kathryn Howard was executed. She had the fear and trauma of having evidence gathered against her and losing her head. ABI, with a focus on testing, means that many people feel fearful as evidence is gathered against them. Many people with brain injury are upset from being judged.
Hide

Identifying the trauma footprint of acquired brain injury

Embed in course/own notes