Endodontic exacerbations - biological and clinical factors

Published on April 27, 2016   38 min

Other Talks in the Therapeutic Area: Oral Health

0:00
Hello, my name is Doctor Paul Rosenberg, and I will be talking to you about endodontic exacerbations and some of the biological and clinical factors that are associated with that problem.
0:17
The information that we will be discussing can be found in my textbook published by Springer, titled 'Endodontic Pain' and that's an all-encompassing text that covers diagnosis, the causes of pain, how to prevent pain and ultimately the treatment of pain. It's highly readable and I think you will find it enjoyable to read.
0:43
We start with the following premise, treating patients with similar teeth, comparable medical and dental histories while using the same clinical approach may not result in a common outcome.
0:59
One of the questions we ask as we enter into this material is: are some of our patients predisposed to pain? That's something that often gets overlooked.
1:13
Our overall approach to pain focuses on being preventative, rather than reacting to pain. I'm sure that you've often heard the phrase "Take this medication when the pain starts". That's a very different approach from what we're suggesting, and we will explain that as we go along.
1:38
There is a pulpal and a periapical tissue response to trauma. While trauma is often thought to be a blow to the face or the head, in this case we're talking about trauma related to things like caries, where the pulp becomes inflamed and may become painful.
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Endodontic exacerbations - biological and clinical factors

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