Nanoengineering the cell surface for targeted drug and cell delivery

Published on May 4, 2015   47 min

Other Talks in the Series: Nanomedicine

0:00
Hello, my name is Jeff Karp. I'm associate professor at the Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, also affiliate faculty at MIT through the Health Sciences and Technology program, and a principal faculty at the Harvard Stem Cell Institute. And today, I'm going to be describing for you some of the technologies that we've been developing in my laboratory that aim to use nanomedicine to control cells following transplantation. So this is directly applicable to cell-based therapy.
0:36
I have a few disclosures to get out of the way. I consult for a number of companies. And this is an institutional requirement that I make these disclosures in all of my presentations. I also own equity in Gecko Biomedical and in Skintifique.
0:55
Ten to 15 years from now, I believe that you, a colleague, a friend, a family member, will visit cell infusion centers to receive routine therapy for multiple diseases and tissue defects.
1:10
And I believe that this is possible because an allogeneic cell source has been identified where you can actually expand those cells, derive them from one person, expand them, and then transfer them into somebody else, administer them, without any immune-suppressive regimen. And these cells were discovered by Alexander Friedenstein in 1976. And he observed that these cells in the bone marrow could be culture expanded. And they exhibited multi-potential properties. Some years later, they were coined mesenchymal stem cells by Arnold Caplan. And these cells have very intriguing properties. In addition to being culture expanded, they can promote angiogenesis, so new blood vessel formation, and stabilize those blood vessels. They can also differentiate into multiple cell types that can create connective tissues, such as bone, fat, and cartilage. And they also have impressive immunomodulatory behavior. So they can actually downregulate inflammation.
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Nanoengineering the cell surface for targeted drug and cell delivery

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