Deep brain stimulation for Parkinson’s disease

Published on June 2, 2014   51 min

A selection of talks on Clinical Practice

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0:00
My name is Michael Okun, I'm a professor of neurology at the University of Florida at the Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration, and I'm also the national medical director for the National Parkinson's Foundation. And today I'm going to be presenting a lecture on deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease. And it's going to be a nice overview of the field for people who may be interested in this topic.
0:26
These are my conflicts of interests. And I have no industry conflicts of interest, I don't take any personal contributions from any industry sources. And all of the deep brain stimulation work is funded either by the National Institutes of Health or by foundations.
0:44
This is a picture of our group. And I always like to acknowledge the group here that is so outstanding in the Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration. We're located in Gainesville, Florida in the United States. And this is the group that makes all the special things happen, and so when I talk to you about deep brain stimulation and some of the work that our group has done and collaborated with other groups, you'll know I'm speaking for many people, not just myself.
1:12
This is a list of many of those people who I am deeply indebted to in the deep brain stimulation area, particularly Kelly Foote who is our neurosurgeon at the University of Florida.
1:24
This is a picture of a several of our trainees, as we have a large training program for people who come from all over the world to learn about deep brain stimulation. And I think it's really interesting, now that we've had over 30 fellows, that we see neurologists, neurosurgeons, psychiatrists, and now even physical medicine and general docs who are interested in this area. And I think it's a really important point to make that this is a bionic age- there over 100,000 of these devices implanted and that number is growing tremendously and growing fast. And because of that, we're seeing quite a bit of interest for people in training and in education, but also a need to inform people in emergency rooms and in general practices that these types of devices are here to stay and we'll all have to learn to deal with them. So I think that this talk on deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease will become more and more important as the next decade evolves.
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Deep brain stimulation for Parkinson’s disease

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