Bi-directional communication at the neurovascular unit: implications for neuronal function

Published on October 31, 2016   37 min

Other Talks in the Series: Physiology and Pathophysiology of Neuroglia

0:00
Hello. My name is Jessica Filosa. I'm in the Department of Physiology at Augusta University. As part of this lecture series, the subject of my talk is Bi-directional Communication at the Neurovascular Unit: Implications for Neuronal Function.
0:15
The outline for this lecture is as follow. First, I will briefly discuss the anatomical organization of the cerebral blood vessels and corresponding innervations. Second, I will discuss neurovascular coupling mechanism with an emphasis on potassium signaling. Third, I will introduce a novel in vitro approach to study neurovascular coupling in the brain. And lastly, I will talk about bi-directional communication at the neurovascular unit and provide evidence for vascular to glia to neuronal coupling.
0:47
Even though the brain constitutes a small portion of our total body mass, about 2%, it consumes a significant amount of oxygen and glucose, about 25%. Main reason for this large energy consumption is the need to restore ion influxes which are altered during increases in synaptic activity. Importantly, as the brain is not efficient at storing energy, a continuous supply of oxygen and glucose is needed for normal brain function. This is chiefly accomplished through two fundamental mechanisms. Functional hyperemia or neurovascular coupling, where a local increase in neuronal activity is matched with an increase in cerebral blood flow supply and cerebral autoregulation, which basically maintains constant profusion in the phase of blood pressure changes.
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Bi-directional communication at the neurovascular unit: implications for neuronal function

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