Tissue damage control confers host tolerance to infection

Published on April 29, 2012   42 min

Other Talks in the Series: Cells of the Innate Immune System

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Tissue damage control confers host tolerance to infection.
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Resistance versus tolerance to infection. It is now well established that there are two host offense strategies against pathogenic microorganisms and parasites. It can be divided into two conceptually different components. The first is resistance to infection. This is a defense strategy that protects the infected host by reducing its pathogenic burden. Resistance is a function of the immune system, which works by detection, neutralization, destruction, or expulsion of pathogens. Tolerance to infection is a second host defense strategy that reduces the negative impact of infection on host fitness, as does resistance to infection. Unlike resistance to infection however, tolerance does not affect directly pathogen burden. Rather, tolerance limits host susceptibility to tissue damage or other fitness costs caused either directly by pathogens or indirectly by the immune response against them.
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Tolerance to infection and tissue damage control. Infectious diseases reflect the extent of cell, tissue, organ, or system damage caused directly by pathogens or indirectly by the host immune response elicited by those pathogens. Host protective strategies that limit the severity of infectious diseases must incorporate mechanisms that limit the extent of cell, tissue, organ, and ultimately, system damage. We'll refer to those mechanisms as tissue damage control.
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Tissue damage control confers host tolerance to infection

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