Surveillance, prevention and control of vector-borne infections

Published on November 28, 2010 Updated on October 1, 2014   73 min

Other Talks in the Series: Vector-Borne Diseases

0:00
Welcome to our study of surveillance, prevention, and control of vector-borne diseases. My name is Jonathan Day. And I'm a professor of medical entomology at the University of Florida, Florida Medical Entomology Laboratory. And I will be your guide through this module.
0:17
We will use five vector-borne disease model systems for our discussion. Certainly, there are many other vector-borne diseases that we could discuss. But our focus in this module will include these five disease systems-- St. Louis encephalitis virus in Florida, dengue and Chikungunya viruses in Florida, West Nile virus in North America, and finally, Eastern equine encephalitis virus in North America.
0:47
We will begin our study by asking the question, what is the purpose of vector-borne disease surveillance? And first, we'll talk about vector-borne pathogen detection.
0:59
The first purpose of vector-borne disease surveillance is to detect a new virus or a reintroduced virus in an area. As you can see from this 2002 news clip from the Stuart News in Stuart, Florida, there are a number of different ways that scientists look for the reemergence of a virus in an area where it's known that that virus occurred previously. In this case, they're talking about sentinel chickens, the use of sentinel chickens, and the use of tracking meteorological events to forecast virus transmission. So surveillance techniques-- and we'll get into these surveillance techniques in detail later in the module-- surveillance techniques allow the identification of the emergence or reemergence of a vector-borne disease in a particular area.
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Surveillance, prevention and control of vector-borne infections

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