Mouse models to investigate cell cycle and cancer

Published on April 30, 2009 Updated on May 28, 2020   62 min

Other Talks in the Therapeutic Area: Oncology

0:00
This is a presentation by Philip Kaldis from the Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, IMCB from Singapore. I will tell you about our investigations into the regulation of the cell cycle in vivo, using mouse model systems.
0:17
The cell cycle is divided in four different phases 'S' phase where DNA is replicated and the 'M' phase or mitosis where the cells physically divide. And in between we have the so called gap phases G1 and G2. These gap phases are actually very important in preparing the events in 'S' phase in mitosis and also to monitor the completion of these events. So they contain the so called check points. The transitions between one cell cycle phase to the next one is promoted by cyclin-dependent kinases and on the slide, I've indicated some of these kinases.
0:56
Cyclin-dependent kinase belong to a superfamily of protein kinases, consisting of 20 members in mammals and generally Cdks are small molecules of about 30 to 40 KiloDalton. They consist of a better rich N-terminus, and a helix C-terminus and in between, you can see the ATP binding sites in here as well as the so-called T-loop or activation segment in red or in yellow. Now, on the right side, in purple, you see a fragment of cyclin A.
1:32
Cyclin molecules are highly unstable proteins that are synthesized and degraded throughout the cell cycle. So, for example, cyclin E is synthesized in G1 and degraded in S phase. Cyclin A is synthesized in S phase and degraded in the middle of mitosis and cyclin B is synthesized at the end of S phase and has to be degraded at the end of mitosis in order for the cells to be able to exit the cell cycle.
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Mouse models to investigate cell cycle and cancer

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