Pediatric stroke: cerebrovascular injury in the developing brain

Published on April 30, 2020   54 min

Other Talks in the Category: Neuroscience

0:00
My name is Adam Kirton. I'm a pediatric neurologist in Calgary, Canada, and I'm a Professor of Pediatrics, Radiology, and Clinical Neuroscience. I have a special interest in stroke in children, and that's what I'm going to speak about today. I'd like to thank the organizers for inviting me to give this talk and look forward to teaching you something about the youngest stroke patients, what's unique about them, and sometimes the amazing things they can do. I'll give you many examples of many bad outcomes, but also a lot of good outcomes that I hope you find inspiring.
0:37
I don't have any particular disclosures other than sitting on some scientific advisory boards and receiving research grants from the agencies listed below. I'm also the editor of a textbook on brain stimulation.
0:49
The primary learning objectives for today are to give you a general overview, first of the clinical side of how strokes present in young patients, and by that I mean everything from the fetus and newborn through to teenagers. I'll go over the different types of stroke, how they present, the underlying causes and risk factors, and how these are managed. The second objective, that is somewhat more specific to young stroke patients, is to comment on recovery and outcomes, and in particular, how well young stroke patients can sometimes do and how that relates to the plasticity of the developing brain that may be a bit different from that seen in adults.
1:30
Stroke really can happen at any age. Most people think of old people when they hear the word stroke. But a stroke in the fetus, newborn, and in children is a relatively common problem in my field of child neurology. Perinatal stroke affects up to 10,000 children just in Canada, that's a population of about 35 million people. The incidence of stroke later in childhood is actually more common than brain tumors, so these are real neurological problems. While they are relatively small percentage of all stroke seen in the world, they have unique elements that I'll try to highlight to you today, that I think teaches us a lot about stroke as a disease in general.
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Pediatric stroke: cerebrovascular injury in the developing brain

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