Smoking & stroke: best practices for your patients

Published on December 31, 2018   25 min
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Good morning, I'm Andrew Pipe from the Minto Prevention and Rehabilitation Center at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute in Ottawa, Canada. It's my pleasure to greet you this morning to begin a conversation about smoking and stroke, with an emphasis on the best practices for your patients.
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It's important to understand that of all of the clinical interventions that can be delivered from a preventive perspective, nothing is as powerful in any clinical setting as smoking cessation.
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Unfortunately, when we address smoking cessation we have to confront a variety of outmoded misconceptions, prejudicial attitudes, and frank misunderstandings about the basis of smoking, smoking behavior, and approaches to smoking cessation. I term these "the zombie concepts"; concepts which are difficult to kill off and which get in the way of our being able to effectively help those of our patients who are smokers.
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Although stroke is sometimes referred to as a cerebrovascular accident, it's no accident. Approximately, 75 percent of all strokes can be attributed to an adverse risk factor profile.
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It's also important to recognize that it's been suggested that it's difficult to identify any other condition that represents such a mixture of lethality, prevalence, and neglect as does tobacco addiction. All of them are ironic, given that we have an array of effective and readily available interventions in the 21st century.
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Smoking & stroke: best practices for your patients

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