The biomechanics of back pain: what we know so far

Published on July 30, 2015   43 min

Other Talks in the Series: Back Pain Management

0:00
Welcome to "The Biomechanics of Back Pain, What We Know So Far." This is going to be an account of the mechanical and biological origins of low back pain. I'm Mike Adams. I'm professor of biomechanics at the University of Bristol in the UK. My background is in physics and in biology. I'm not a clinician, and I don't treat patients. But I will, of course, be dealing with clinical matters.
0:26
Well this is a running order of the topics in this presentation. First of all, I'll begin with some functional anatomy. I'll describe some features of anatomy I'll be wanting to refer to later on. Then I'll tackle the most important question, where does back pain come from? I'll then go on to discuss spinal injuries under three headings. I'll consider where the forces come from that act on the spine, and then describe how those forces can injure different structures in the spine. And then, under vulnerable tissues, I'll try to explain why some people hurt their backs, where other people seem to get away with loading them very severely without any adverse consequences. The next, topic spinal degeneration, will be the biggest single topic. And here I'll try to explain how injury to specific tissues, particularly cartilage, can lead to degenerative changes, and how these degenerative changes can lead to chronic back pain. The final topic, functional pathology, I'll deal with very briefly. And then I'll pull the talk together in the final slide.
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The biomechanics of back pain: what we know so far

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