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T-Mobile: strategic decisions to improve position in the market

Published on May 29, 2016 Originally recorded 2008   7 min
0:02
T-Mobile's strategic objectives was very, very clearly identified. Four or five years ago or probably three or four years ago, T-Mobile's brand positioning was fundamentally commoditized. If you could think back to the early 2000s, we had Vodafone with a very dominant position in the network market. O2, a very good second, a good and credible second. Virgin, a cheeky and lovable new entrant, and T-Mobile really selling itself on price alone and with price promotions. The sub-management T-Mobile in the UK decided that this wasn't sustainable for the brand. This is a prime example of a strategic decision by a brand to change brand positioning quite significantly. The bravest part about this decision, one reason why we like it so much, is because the brand decided that it would focus its marketing activity, sponsor activity, in particular, on 18 to 22-year-olds. There was a feel like a tactical reason for this in terms of that audience being key for mobile phone acquisition, but it was also because that was the brand positioning that had been arrived at in comparison within consideration of the competitive landscape. It was a very, very, very specific brief. General brands will present a far wider range of objectives. A good part of our work is helping them to narrow these objectives down to the one or two driver. It's very much about prioritization. In this case, the client had done all the work for us, and we were very clear from the outset. It also backed this up with smart objectives and KPIs against some different elements of the brand funnel and sales. This very tight objective of reaching 18 to 22-year-olds similarly made it
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T-Mobile: strategic decisions to improve position in the market

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