The predominant clonal evolution (PCE) concept of microbial pathogens and its practical usefulness

Published on October 1, 2007 Updated on April 30, 2018   29 min

Other Talks in the Category: Diseases, Disorders & Treatments

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The work presented here is a result of a long-term collaboration started in the early '80s with Professor Francisco J. Ayala, University of California Irvine.
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The predominant clonal evolution of parch is of interest to all kinds of pathogenic microorganisms. Eukaryotic, parasitic protozoa and fungi; prokaryotic, bacteria and viruses of medical veterinary or agronomical relevance.
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The so-called clonality sexuality debate started in the late '70s. This literature is littered with imprecise subjective assertions such as strong influence of recombination, far from being a clonal species, extensive genetic exchange which are both informative. The PCE approach aims at settling clear cut criteria to distinguish between sexuality and clonality.
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This research led to the publication of more than 200 international papers. I will briefly present the main ones here. The program started in 1980, when I was in Bolivia studying Trypanosoma cruzi, the parasite responsible for Chagas disease. This disease ranges from Southern USA to Northern Argentina and causes, between others, severe cardiac insufficiencies. The progress of modern genomics, whole genome sequencing and massive single nucleotide polymorphism yielded a flood of published data. This made it possible to considerably refine the model until its present states.
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The predominant clonal evolution (PCE) concept of microbial pathogens and its practical usefulness

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