Subarachnoid hemorrhage diagnosis and management

Published on November 28, 2019   39 min

Other Talks in the Therapeutic Area: Neurology

0:00
My name is Gary Steinberg. I'm the Lacroute-Hearst Professor and Chair of the Department of Neurosurgery at Stanford University School of Medicine and the founder and co-director of the Stanford stroke center. I'm going to talk to you today about subarachnoid hemorrhage diagnosis and management.
0:18
As you can see, subarachnoid hemorrhage represents only about 10 percent of all strokes, but it has a significant morbidity and mortality associated with it, particularly in young and middle aged patients.
0:32
Traumatic brain injury is a common cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage, but does not usually cause a stroke. I want to focus on spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage, the most common cause of which is a ruptured intracranial aneurysm. As you can see on this slide, there are many other causes much less frequent of spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage.
0:53
Intracranial aneurysms occur in patients between approximately 35 to 65 years old. Prevalence of about two to five percent in the population and there's a significant morbidity and mortality of about 60 percent overall associated with ruptured intracranial aneurysm. You can see that the median mortality varies according to country.
1:17
The incidence of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage varies from two to 100,000 in China to ten times that in Finland. In the US, it's about 12 to 15 for a 100,000 patients. It's more common in women and interestingly, significant percentage of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage have another family member who also have a confirm intracranial aneurysm.
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Subarachnoid hemorrhage diagnosis and management

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