Suspected child sexual abuse and the role of the health care professional in diagnosis and treatment 2

Published on August 28, 2018   30 min

Other Talks in the Category: Diseases, Disorders & Treatments

0:00
During the second half of the presentation, we'll provide an opportunity to understand a little bit more about our approach to the medical and actual physical examination, and interpretation of findings, as well as the formulation of a diagnostic impression, including recommendations for treatment and follow-up.
0:19
We're going to examine a child and these are some of the preliminaries. We obtain historical details of the alleged event. Those details may be obtained from child protective services, from the non-offending parent; we clarify additional details that we believe need to be obtained, we develop rapport and trust with the child when we meet them. We explain to the child the purpose of examination, we tell the child what is going to happen. When I first meet children in our lobby, the first thing I say to them is that there are no shots, and no needles, and they have sighs of relief. When we're engaging in conversation with a child about what happened, we use the child's names that they use for their body parts, we encourage the child to ask questions, we assess the cooperativeness of the child, we allow the child to select the adult ally to be present during the examination, and we always encourage the child to participate in a complete head-to-toe examination. The reason that we do a head-to-toe examination, and not just a genital or anal examination when sexual abuse is concerned, is that we want to give a message to children that all parts of their body are important, and we will look at every part of their body.
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Suspected child sexual abuse and the role of the health care professional in diagnosis and treatment 2

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