Sjogren’s disease - epidemiology, etiology, pathogenesis & diagnosis

Published on October 31, 2016   32 min

Other Talks in the Therapeutic Area: Immunology & Inflammation

0:00
My name is Nancy Carteron. I'm a Scientist in San Francisco. I'm a Senior Consultant in Rheumatology and Immunology and an Associate Clinical Professor at University California San Francisco, here in San Francisco. Today we're gonna talk about Sjogren's disease.
0:22
The topics that I would like to cover include briefly, introducing the topic, moving onto epidemiology. Then we'll focus on etiology and pathogenesis, moving on to symptoms and signs of the disease, followed by diagnosis. We'll touch on some treatment options. And briefly conclude with some information on the prognosis of the disease.
0:50
So Sjogren's is a serious autoimmune disease. It was first described by Henrik Sjogren in 1933, who was an ophthalmologist. And even from the first reports, the hallmark, which maintains true to today, is an infiltration of target exocrine glands by lymphocytes. These lymphocytes can infiltrate a wide range of glands and target organs not just the exocrine glands. And this can include skin, lung, gastrointestinal, nervous system tissue, particularly the ganglia. Sjogren's can occur alone and then is referred to as primary Sjogren's or concomitant with another autoimmune disease, then referred to as secondary Sjogren's. Examples of these other autoimmune diseases that commonly can co-associate with Sjogren's are rheumatoid arthritis, primary biliary cirrhosis, and lupus.
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Sjogren’s disease - epidemiology, etiology, pathogenesis & diagnosis

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