Fundamentals of nanoscale materials and technology

Published on October 29, 2015   58 min

Other Talks in the Series: Nanomedicine

0:00
Welcome to the Henry Stewart Talks series on nanomedicine. I'm Richard Siegel, the Robert W. Hunt Professor of Material Science and Engineering, and director of the Nanotechnology Center at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York.
0:18
On the first slide, we see that the ages of the world are a history of materials, the Stone Age, the Bronze Age, the Iron Age. In the 19th century, as the industrial revolution began and one learned to add carbon to iron and produce steel of various types, steel dominated that century and the icons of that century, from the railroad during the middle of the century, to the icons of the end of the century in the Brooklyn Bridge, the Eiffel Tower, and the Ferris wheel. In the 20th century, the rapid advance of science and the needs of the world developed three different classes of materials which dominated that century, and continue to dominate our lives today. Plastics in the early part of the century needed to replace the natural polymers of rubber and silk, that were no longer available during the war-time periods. In the middle of the century, silicon in its highest purity forms, which was needed to create the world of computers that we depend upon today, and finally, nanomaterials in the latter part of the 20th century, which we'll talk about today.
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Fundamentals of nanoscale materials and technology

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