Purinoceptors and fast purinergic transmission at neuromuscular junctions and synapses

Published on April 2, 2014 Updated on April 6, 2014   48 min

Other Talks in the Series: Synapses, Neurotransmitters and Receptor Channels

0:00
I'm Geoff Burnstock. I was brought up in a boxing family, but then I finished a Ph.D. at King's College and University College. I then did a post-doc at Mill Hill with Feldberg and then in Oxford with Edith Bulbring. I went to America on a Rockefeller Fellowship and then took a lectureship in Australia because I liked the Australians more than anybody else when I was in Oxford. And after 16 years, I became head of the Department of Zoology there. I returned to London to UCL to take over the chair of anatomy and embryology from J Z Young. And then when I stepped down from the headship in '97, they set up me up with the research at the Autonomic Neuroscience Research Institute at the Royal Free Hospital. And I am passionate for research even at my age of 85.
0:60
The purinergic signaling hypothesis-- that is ATP is an extracellular signaling molecule-- was proposed in 1972. But it was not widely accepted until the early 1990s when receptors for ATP were cloned and characterized. It is now a field that is expanding rapidly in many different directions in both neuronal and non-neuronal tissues. In this talk, I will focus on the role of ATP as a neurotransmitter at both autonomic neuromuscular junctions and in the synaptic transmission both in the peripheral and central nervous systems. So I'll begin with the discovery of purinergic neuromuscular transmission, but first I need to explain that autonomic neurotransmission is at non-synaptic sites. Varicose fibers involve release of transmitter en passage, so they are a transient contact with effector cells to form neuromuscular injunctions.
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Purinoceptors and fast purinergic transmission at neuromuscular junctions and synapses

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